PIRATED 20130920 2314

PIRATED 20130920 2314

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See also the pirated main article Managing Windows 7 through Command Line which links to additionalpirated chapters of the book.

According to the US Copyright Act every content which is substantially similar to the original is a plagiarism.






gpresult.exe is a command-line tool built into Windows that can be used for displaying Group Policy settings and RSoP for a specified user or a computer. Two new command-line switches were added to gpresult beginning with Windows Vista SP1 and Windows Server 2008 that I will explain them in this article:

  • gpresult /x filename.xml
  • gpresult /h filename.html

Common switches that you can use for gpresult command are as follow:

gpresult


Shows the help file, if no switches are included. At least one switch needs to be provided to actually see Group Policy results. Look at the following figure:



-OR-




gpresult /r


Displays Resultant Set of Policy (RSoP) summary data. The summary data doesn’t include the settings that have been applied to the user or computer.

Note: RSoP reports Group Policy settings that are applied to a user or computer.




gpresult /x filename.xml


Saves the report in XML format at the location and with the filename specified by the "filename.xml" parameter. You can then open the file in Internet Explorer.






gpresult /h filename.html/filename.htm


Saves the report in HTML format at the location and with the filename specified by the "filename.html" or "filename.htm" parameter. You can then open the file in Internet Explorer.



-OR-



The result:






gpresult /f


Forces gpresult to overwrite an existing file. This is used with the /x or /h command.

Note that, if you do not include this switch and if the destination target has a file with the same name as the name when you specify /x or /h switches, the following error message will be showed:



Now the same scenario, but this one with the use of /f switch. Look at the following figure:




gpresult /v


Returns results in verbose mode. This provides additional details on Group Policy settings.


gpresult /z


Specifies that super-verbose mode is used. This provides significantly more details on Group Policy settings than verbose mode.


gpresult /s computername




gpresult /u {user | domain\user}




gpresult /u {user | domain\user} /p password




gpresult /scope {user | computer}


Retrieves only the user or only the computer settings with the /scope switch. This option can only be used when also using one of the following switches: /x, /h, /r, /v, or /z. Look at the following examples:



-AND-



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  • With this steps is easy learn some of cmd

  • Richard Mueller edited Revision 7. Comment: Removed (en-US) from title, added tags

  • Carsten Siemens edited Revision 13. Comment: Pirated Content - see my comment

  • NOTE: This article was reported as Pirated/Plagiarized Content (content you didn't write) and will be removed. Please do not steal content from others. If you feel we are mistaken, please leave a comment or email tnwiki at Microsoft with a link to this article and with clear and detailed reasons why you own the content or have explicit permission from the author.

    Content was taken from: "Book - Windows 7 Portable Command Guide"

    Published by Darril Gibson (Pearson)

    de.scribd.com/.../67827130-Windows-7-Portable-Command-Guide-MCTS-70-680-70-685-70-686

    my.safaribooksonline.com/.../ch01

    See also the pirated main article Managing Windows 7 through Command Line which links to additionalpirated chapters of the book:

    social.technet.microsoft.com/.../12066.pirated-20130920-2224.aspx

    According to the US Copyright Act every content which is *substantially similar* to the original is a plagiarism.

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